General Information:
Q: How do I get to Ward Pound Ridge Reservation/Trailside?
 
Q: Is Ward Pound Ridge Reservation a Native American reservation?
 
Q: Why do I have to keep my dog on a leash?
 
Q: How do I reserve a lean-to, picnic-, or tent-site?
 
Q: How can I volunteer at the park/museum? What kind of help do you need?
 
Q: Are there ticks in the park?
 
Outdoor recreation:
Q: Can I fish or hunt in the Park?
 
Q: Is there swimming in the park?
 
Q: Can I have a picnic in the park?
 
Q: Can I ride my bicycle in the park?
 
Q: Can I ride my horse in the park?
 
Q: Is any form of boating permitted on the park's waterways?
 
Q: Are ATVs or snowmobiles permitted?
 
Museum and park facilities:
Q: Are there any live animals in the museum?
 
Q: Do you do birthday parties?
 
Q: Can books be borrowed from the Delaware Indian Resource Center?
 
Q: Is there someplace in the park to get food?
 
Wildlife:
Q: What kind of wildlife lives in the park?
 
Q: I found a hurt/baby animal. What should I do?
 
Attractions:
Q: Who was the Leatherman?
 
Q: How old is the big oak tree in the meadow?
 
Q: Is the fire tower still standing?
 
General Information:
Q: How do I get to Ward Pound Ridge Reservation/Trailside?
A: Click here for directions.
 
Q: Is Ward Pound Ridge Reservation a Native American reservation?
A: No. It is a reserved area for plants and animals. However, there has been a Native American presence in the park in the past as evidenced by the Bear Rock petroglyph and remains of a hunting camp/expedition.
 
Q: Why do I have to keep my dog on a leash?
A: It is a county ordinance. And it was passed for good reason: even the best-trained dog may react instinctually when it encounters wildlife, thereby putting either itself or another animal in danger. Additionally, families as well as school groups hike the trails and some people are afraid of dogs.
 
Q: How do I reserve a lean-to, picnic-, or tent-site?
A: Call the park office at (914) 864-7317.
 
Q: How can I volunteer at the park/museum? What kind of help do you need?
A: Click here for Volunteer Opportunities.
 
Q: Are there ticks in the park?
A: There are ticks throughout Westchester, including within the park. However, by taking standard precautions (tucking pant cuffs into socks, doing a tick check) they should not prevent you from enjoying your visit.
 
Outdoor recreation:
Q: Can I fish or hunt in the Park?
A: Hunting is strictly prohibited. Trout fishing in the Cross River is on a catch and release basis only. Live bait is prohibited.
 
Q: Is there swimming in the park?
A: There are no swimming facilities in the park, nor is swimming permitted in the rivers, pools, or streams.
 
Q: Can I have a picnic in the park?
A: Yes. Click here for important park rules.
 
Q: Can I ride my bicycle in the park?
A: Bicycles are welcome on the park's paved roads but are not permitted on dirt trails.
 
Q: Can I ride my horse in the park?
A: Yes. Inquire at the park office for details.
 
Q: Is any form of boating permitted on the park's waterways?
A: No.
 
Q: Are ATVs or snowmobiles permitted?
A: No.
 
Museum and park facilities:
Q: Are there any live animals in the museum?
A: No. We prefer our animals free in their natural environment. However, we do have a fine collection of mounted birds and mammals (specimens have been donated or mounted from roadkill).
 
Q: Do you do birthday parties?
A: No. We do not have sufficient staffing or facilities to make this possible. We can recommend other nature centers and organizations that do, upon request.
 
Q: Can books be borrowed from the Delaware Indian Resource Center?
A: No. However, you may schedule time in the center for research by contacting the museum staff.
 
Q: Is there someplace in the park to get food?
A: No, but there are restaurants and grocery stores within a three-minute drive in the town of Cross River.
 
Wildlife:
Q: What kind of wildlife lives in the park?
A: Deer, turkey, coyote, gray and red squirrels, chipmunk, bobcat, river otter, nearly 200 species of bird, as well as insects, numerous amphibian and reptile species. Many other animals have been found in the park. All are protected within park boundaries.
 
Q: I found a hurt/baby animal. What should I do?
A: Read the "do's and don'ts" in this article.
 
Attractions:
Q: Who was the Leatherman?
A: Click here for a brief article.
 
Q: How old is the big oak in the meadow?
A: The Meadow Oak, a giant White Oak with a circumference of nearly 15 feet had already sprouted before the arrival of the Europeans in North America. Its exact age is not known, though estimates place it at nearly 500 years old.
 
Q: Is the fire tower still standing?
A: No. It was taken down in 1982.

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